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WHAT WE’RE READING: ACA's Political Power Wanes

Posted on October 21, 2014  |  Permalink

Topics: Food and Nutrition, Health Care Reform, 2014, Diseases and Conditions

  • "Obamacare Losing Power as a Campaign Weapon," New York Times: Democrats are largely stepping back from the issue despite its enrollment success because most voters have employer-sponsored coverage, and because health insurance has little traction among voters.   
  • "Daily Soda Consumption Seriously Messes Up Your DNA," Salon: New research finds that drinking one 20-ounce soda per day was linked with 4.6 years of biological aging.  
  • "Parkinson's Drugs May Spur Compulsive Behaviors," HealthDay/U.S. News and World Report: A research review of FDA records finds that the drugs could potentially increase the risk of impulsive control disorders, such as compulsive gambling and compulsive shopping.  

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WHAT WE’RE READING: ACA's Political Power Wanes

Update: Ebola Protocol and Policy Changes in the U.S.

Posted on October 17, 2014  |  Permalink

Topics: Public Health, Diseases and Conditions

In the last few days, the U.S. has begun implementing unprecedented measures to deal with the Ebola virus that has been confirmed in three cases and resulted in one death in the U.S.

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Update: Ebola Protocol and Policy Changes in the U.S.

WHAT WE’RE READING: Measuring Calorie Content Through Exercise

Posted on October 17, 2014  |  Permalink

Topics: Obesity, Diseases and Conditions, 2014

  • "Reality Check: To Burn Off a Soda, You'll Have To Run 50 Minutes," NPR's "The Salt": A study finds that adolescents bought fewer sweetened beverages when calorie content was listed with how long an individual would have to exercise to burn it off.
  • "Mentoring Kids in Poverty Helps Lower Health Risks: Study," Reuters: A new study finds that low-income adolescents in areas of worsening poverty who do not have a mentor had twice the allostatic load -- the overall physical strain on the body from chronic stress -- than those who had a mentor.
  • "When Doctors and Nurses Work Together," New York Times' "Well": Yale-New Haven Hospital's obstetrics and gynecology department reduced adverse patient outcomes and saved nearly $50 million in liability payments over five years by implementing reforms that integrated physicians and nurses.  

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WHAT WE’RE READING: Measuring Calorie Content Through Exercise