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Massachusetts just enacted the toughest e-cigarette restrictions in the US

December 3, 2019


Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker (R) on Wednesday signed into law a bill that imposes new state restrictions on sales of flavored tobacco and vaping products, including menthol cigarettes, in response to the growing number of youth using e-cigarettes and an outbreak of a vaping-linked lung illness.

Want to be a doctor? Beware the 'hidden costs' of medical school.

December 3, 2019


The so-called "hidden costs" of medical school—from Medical College Admission Test registration fees to travel expenses for interviews—can pose a barrier for low-income students who want enter the profession.

Exercise might fight depression. But how much do you need?

December 3, 2019


Exercise might be linked to a reduced risk of depression, even in people who are genetically predisposed to the condition, according to recent research that analyzed data from the ongoing Partners Biobank study.

Why doctors need to be leaders (and how to cultivate leadership)

December 3, 2019


While doctors typically are thought of as "scientists, caregivers, or educators, … we must also understand [them] as leaders," Dhruv Khullar, a physician and assistant professor of medicine and health care policy at Weill Cornell, writes for the New York Times' "Well," noting that both doctors and patients stand to benefit from more physician leadership in U.S. health care.

The 25 best health care inventions of 2019, according to TIME

December 2, 2019


TIME recently released its list of the 100 Best Inventions of 2019 based on factors including creativity, effectiveness, influence, and originality—and 25 health care inventions made the list.

'There's something terribly wrong': Why more US residents are dying in middle age

December 2, 2019


U.S. residents for decades had seen improvements in average life expectancy, but the trend reversed in 2014—with more U.S. residents dying at middle age from drug overdoses, diseases, obesity, suicide, and dozens of other causes, according to a study published Tuesday in JAMA.

Federal exchange signups still lag behind last year, but are picking up pace

December 2, 2019


CMS on Wednesday announced about 2.37 million people have signed up for federal exchange plans so far during the Affordable Care Act's current open enrollment period, which is down by about 2% when compared with the first four weeks of last year's open enrollment period.

Do we have to age and die? Here's what science says.

December 2, 2019


Early research supports the theory that humans age as a result of primeval genetic mechanisms intended to regulate and repair our aging cells, but there might be ways to "turn off" these mechanisms to slow or even reverse aging, according to David Sinclair, a professor of genetics at Harvard Medical School, and Matthew LaPlante, an associate professor of journalism at Utah State University.

Judge vacates criminal convictions against pharma execs in first-of-its-kind opioid case

December 2, 2019


A federal judge on Tuesday partially vacated criminal convictions against former Insys Therapeutics executives in a first-of-its-kind case accusing the executives of contributing to the opioid epidemic.

Bad debt is rising again at nonprofit hospitals, Moody's finds

December 2, 2019


The amount of bad debt nonprofit hospitals experience increased in 2018 for the first time since 2014, in part because of changes to insurance benefit designs that are placing greater financial responsibility on patients, according to a new report from Moody's Investors Service.

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